SolveUSS provides a centralized facility for monitoring resource usages in the z/OS systems and for tracking z/OS UNIX application activities. The features that monitor and track the resource usages consists of the following:
  • UNIX System Call tracing and statistical information reporting
  • Real time z/OS UNIX resource monitoring
  • z/OS information viewer
  • z/OS SMF data browser

UNIX System Call tracing and statistical information reporting

SolveUSS provides the facility for users to trace UNIX System Calls invoked by jobs, processes, and threads of interests. Jobs that are currently active in the system, jobs that are not yet active, processes, threads, or any combination may be targeted by a single tracing request. Users can also request the trace to include Child processes spawned by a targeted parent process. UNIX System Call invocation and pertinent information incurred by the targets are traced and statistical information is collected and recorded into a trace session file for reporting. 

The traced information includes System Call arguments and returned values, time spent on System Calls, file activities such as read/write count, and many more.

The targeted programs can be written in any programming language running in any addressing mode. They can be existing applications (i.e., no need to recompile), applications being developed, or those newly deployed in z/OS.

Using the trace session file as input, users can request full or selected category reports to be generated.

Benefits:

The capability to trace UNIX System Call activities on individual or any combination of jobs, processes, and threads.

Comprehensive reports on UNIX program runtime behavior and statistics enable both MVS and UNIX system personnel to analyze the efficient use of UNIX resources by the traced program.

It can be used as a tool to diagnose and debug programs that invoked UNIX System Calls.

It can be a learning tool to understand how application programs and UNIX interact in the z/OS environment.

(Demo 1) (Demo 2) (Demo 3)

Real time z/OS UNIX resource monitoring

SolveUSS provides detailed information on these z/OS UNIX resources:

  • Configuration parameter settings (i.e. BPXPRMxx)
  • Processes   (Demo)
  • Threads   (Demo)
  • Files   (Demo)
  • File systems
  • HFS global buffer information
  • Signals

z/OS information viewer

SolveUSS provides detailed information about the z/OS system:

  • Active address spaces   (Demo)
  • Subsystems
  • SVCs
  • System cross memory information
  • Address space task information   (Demo)
  • Address space cross memory routine information
  • Address space access-list information
  • Virtual storage content
  • Dataspace storage content
  • Real storage content
z/OS SMF data browser

SolveUSS’s SMF data Browser is a full screen browser for viewing and examining SMF records. The features listed below make the SMF browser a powerful tool for system personnel and programmers to perform SMF data analysis.

  • Display SMF record list in mapped format   (Demo)
  • Display selected SMF record in mapped format   (Demo)
  • Display selected SMF record in DUMP format   (Demo)
  • Scroll directly to a section or field by symbolic name   (Demo)
  • Provides full descriptions for SMF types, subtypes, and record fields.
  • Provides detailed SMF field information such as name, offset, and length.
  • Display data in various formats such as EBCDIC, ASCII, and HEX.   (Demo)
  • SMF record field filtering   (Learn more)
  • Filter list   (Learn more)
SMF data Browser provides mapping support for these SMF record types and subtypes.
(Supported SMF types and subtypes)

                  Demo:

 
Process Summary Report on processes captured in a trace session.

 
Partial report extracted from a trace session on syscalls and parameters executed by a thread.

 
Partial report extracted from a trace session on files accessed by a process.

 
View of UNIX processes on z/OS system.  Provides information such as process ID, identity of the parent, number of
threads a process owned, CPU times, and process state.  Additional process related information can be viewed via PFkey.

 
View of UNIX threads on z/OS system.  Provides information such as thread ID, owning process ID, CPU times
and thread state. Additional threads related information can be viewed via PFkey.

 
View of files accessed by a process.  Provides information such as files types, pathname, inode number, device number,
and socket addresses.  Additional file related information can be viewed via PFkey.

 
View of jobs on z/OS system.  Provides information such as whether the address space is dubbed, number of processes
and threads in the address space, CPU times and swap status. Additional job related information can be viewed via PFkey.

 
View of MVS tasks in an address space.  Provides information such as program name, whether the task is a UNIX thread,
CPU times, and program status. Additional address space and task related information can be viewed via PFkey.

 
Display SMF record list in mapped format

In this format, SMF record fields are identified by symbolic names (i.e. dsect labels). Based on the field’s attribute, the browser converts the value of the field. The list format allows multiple mapped SMF records to be examined together.

This screenshot shows a display of sixteen type 30 subtype 2 records beginning with SMF30TYP, which is the first field in the Subsystem section. The field contents are mapped and are listed under the column headers. The Subsystem section consists of seven fields. Also displayed is the beginning part of the Identification section.

 
Display selected SMF record in mapped format

This format allows users to focus on a single record of interest. In this format, record fields are identified by symbolic names (i.e. dsect labels). Based on the field’s attribute, the browser converts the value of the field. Information such as offset, length, and description are also presented.

This screenshot shows a selected type 30 subtype 2 record in mapped format. The fields shown are in the Subsystem section, which has seven fields, followed by the Identification section.

 
Display selected SMF record in DUMP format

For records that do not have mapping support provided, they can be displayed in DUMP format. This format allows the actual record layout to be examined. It is very useful for debugging programs that write proprietary SMF records. This screenshot shows a type 30 subtype 2 record in DUMP format.

 
Scroll directly to a section or field by SMF section name or field name

The scroll function allows quick access to any field in the SMF record. Specifying the symbolic name of a field causes the browser to scroll directly to it. This screenshot shows the result display when a scroll field is specified. In this case, the field is SMF92RGD, which is in the Identification section in the type 92 subtype 1 SMF record.

 
Display data in various format

The examples below consist of two screenshots. One displays SMF records in original conversion format. The other displays the SMF records in Hex format. The original conversion format is the format assigned by the browser software based on the field’s attribute. Formats such as ASCII, binary, and various numeric formats are also supported. The display formats are controlled by one PF key.

 
SMF record field filtering

Filtering is the process where the SMF data browser uses filter conditions specified by the user to determine whether an SMF record is to be retrieved and displayed. A filter condition consists of these parameters: AND(&) | OR(+), field name, comparison code, and comparison string. Their meanings follow:

An AND(&) requires that the specified filter condition must be met for a record to be eligible. An OR(+) filter condition needs to be met only if there are no other OR(+) filter conditions meeting their filter requirements.

Field name is the dsect label assigned to the field, e.g. SMF30GRP.

Comparison codes consists of byte level comparison codes (EQ, NE, LT, LE, GE, GT) and bit level comparison codes (BITZ, BITNZ, BITON, and BITEQ).

Comparison string is the value used to compare with the value in the target field. It can be specified in CHAR, HEX, and in NUM format.

The three screenshots below show the resulting display of type 92 subtype 1 records retrieved from the same source using different filter requirements. Type 92 subtype 1 records are written when a File System is mounted.

This screenshot shows a display of the records without filter requirements.

 

This screenshot shows the resulting records produced using the filter condition below.

+ Field name: SMF92MTN   Comparison code: EQ   Comparison string: ZFS

The filter condition specifies that for an SMF record to be eligible, the first three bytes of field “SMF92MTN” (File system type name) must equal to the string “ZFS”.

 

This screenshot shows the resulting records produced using filter list #FSMOUNT#ZFS#PFX#OMVS, which contains two filter conditions as follows:

& Field name: SMF92MTN   Comparison code: EQ   Comparison string: ZFS

& Field name: SMF92MFN   Comparison code: EQ   Comparison string: OMVS.

In order for an SMF record to be eligible, the requirements specified by both filter conditions in the filter list must be met. The first filter condition specifies that the first three bytes of field “SMF92MTN” (File system type name) must equal to the string “ZFS”. The second filter condition specifies that the first five bytes of field “SMF92MFN” (File system name) must equal to the string “OMVS.”.

Filter list

A filter list is a user created list that contains one or more user defined filter conditions that the SMF data browser uses to filter SMF records. It is a powerful record filtering mechanism using all filter conditions defined in the list to determine whether a record is eligible to be retrieved. By tailoring filter conditions within a filter list, a specific set of SMF records can be targeted.

You can create any number of filter lists, each with filter conditions defined to target SMF records of interest. The browser also provides the facility to save filter lists for use across SMF data browser sessions.

For explanation of filter conditions, see SMF record field filtering.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Please feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

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